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8 Tips if you’re feeling homesick

 

Our volunteers have compiled 8 tips to help you if you’re feeling homesick: 

 

 

1) Understand why you are feeling homesick and what homesickness is:  

 

This article summarises what happens to your body and mind when you feel homesick:  https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/what-happens-mind-body-homesick_us_5b201ebde4b09d7a3d77eee1 

 

 

2) Find places within the city to make it feel like home: 

 

- Establish your favourite coffee shop/book shop/park – you will soon start to recognise faces in these places, and they will begin to feel familiar and homely. 

- Volunteer to feel a part of the local community – a couple hours in a charity shop, or university role/society will give you another purpose within the city and allow you to make friends outside of your degree and your ordinary routine.  
 

 

3) Re-create the comforts of home

 

- Think about if there is anything specific you are missing from home, maybe home cooked meals, maybe watching TV as a family unit, maybe your local park. 

- Cook yourself a warm comforting meal once a week – it can also be useful to cook for flats mates and eat together once a week.  

- Decorate your room with things to make it feel your own. Student dorms and flats can often be dull looking, but blankets lamps and pictures can soon help it feel more like your own safe space.  
 

 

4) Distract yourself: 

 

Homesickness often occurs during free time. Having a busy schedule is a very effective way to take your mind off homesickness. 
 

 

5) Track your homesickness: 

 

If there are specific days or times during your week when you always experience homesickness, replace these times with something to look forward to – perhaps doing something nice with friends, going to an exercise class or joining a society to take your mind off it.   
 

 

6) Train your brain: 

 

Sometimes it is useful to remember that Semester Two only lasts for four months. When you look at University this way, you can start to make the most of your time at University! 


 

7) Reverse logic:

 

While going home during the semester is great, it can also serve to intensify feelings of homesickness when you return to University life. Limiting the number of times you go home during the semester can be a really effective way to help you settle into life at University.  
 

 

8) And remember... be kind to yourself! 

 

Homesickness is perfectly natural, and many students experience homesickness from time to time. Don’t give yourself a hard time about it. 

 

 

The Advice Place

  • Thu 23 Jan 2020 16:08

     

     

    Our volunteers have compiled 8 tips to help you if you’re feeling homesick: 

     

    1) Understand why you are feeling homesick and what homesickness is:   

     

    This article summarises what happens to your body and mind when you feel homesick:  https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/what-happens-mind-body-homesick_us_5b201ebde4b09d7a3d77eee1 

     

     

    2) Find places within the city to make it feel like home: 

     

    • Establish your favourite coffee shop/book shop/park – you will soon start to recognise faces in these places, and they will begin to feel familiar and homely. 

    • Volunteer to feel a part of the local community – a couple hours in a charity shop, or university role/society will give you another purpose within the city and allow you to make friends outside of your degree and your ordinary routine.  

     

    3) Re-create the comforts of home:

     

    • Think about if there is anything specific you are missing from home, maybe home cooked meals, maybe watching TV as a family unit, maybe your local park. 
    • Cook yourself a warm comforting meal once a week – it can also be useful to cook for flats mates and eat together once a week.  

    • Decorate your room with things to make it feel your own. Student dorms and flats can often be dull looking, but blankets lamps and pictures can soon help it feel more like your own safe space.  

     

    4) Distract yourself: Homesickness often occurs during free time. Having a busy schedule is a very effective way to take your mind off homesickness. 
     

     

    5) Track your homesickness: If there are specific days or times during your week when you always experience homesickness, replace these times with something to look forward to – perhaps doing something nice with friends, going to an exercise class or joining a society to take your mind off it.   
     

     

    6) Train your brain: sometimes it is useful to remember that Semester Two only lasts for four months. When you look at University this way, you can start to make the most of your time at University! 
     

     

    7) Reverse logic: while going home during the semester is great, it can also serve to intensify feelings of homesickness when you return to University life. Limiting the number of times you go home during the semester can be a really effective way to help you settle into life at University.  
     

     

    8) And remember... be kind to yourself! Homesickness is perfectly natural, and many students experience homesickness from time to time. Don’t give yourself a hard time about it. 

     

  • Mon 09 Dec 2019 14:04

    Here are eight tips that can help you and your housemates keep your flat warm over the winter period! 

    1. Check your insulation: Make sure you and all your housemates are shutting windows and doors properly. If there is a gap and a draught getting through, get some cheap draught proofing strips and fill it up.  

    2. Draught excluders: Why not even make your own draught excluder with fluffy socks and rice, find a how to guide here. Alternatively, just used rolled out towels. 

    3. Maintain low heat even if away for the week: It is important in the cold months to keep your thermostat on a low heat to stop your pipes from freezing. At the level it needs to be to prevent freezing you won't be paying much at all, and it will ensure you are not left with burst pipes and an uninhabitable house. Just 10-12°C will do the job. 

    4. Leave the oven open after cooking: this will bring additional warmth to the flat. 

    5. Layer up your bed: Add a fluffy mattress topper for comfort and insulation or switch out your summer thin duvet for a thicker tog in the winter. Alternatively, if you don’t fancy buying a warmer duvet you can get a similar effect by layering up different blankets to keep insulation layers. Top tips for blanket layering: Layer your blankets in the right order. Put knitted or crocheted under your quilt/duvet, not on top - knit fabrics have air pockets that can trap warm air and keep it in the bed where it belongs.  

    6. Take a hot shower right before bed: It’ll warm up your body, giving you heat you can take under the covers with you. 

    7. Radiator reflectors (or tin foil): A genius trick that will make a huge difference in your home. Half of your radiator should be facing the room which radiates nice lovely heat, but what’s happening with the other half? It's being wasted on your wall. You can buy inexpensive radiator reflectors which reflect the heat away from the wall and back into your room. You could also make some yourself by sticking some tin foil on the wall. 

    8. Good old-fashioned hot water bottle: a classic bedtime winter staple!

     

                              

  • Wed 02 Oct 2019 17:41

    Are you a new student in Edinburgh? Feeling a bit overwhelmed by the sudden change of weather, scenery and the Scottish accent? Unsure about what to actually do in this city during your free time? Take a look at this list of 10 things to do for free.

     

     

    1)      Go for a wander in the Old Town. Not sure what to do on a sunny afternoon? I was surprised too but they occasionally happen in Scotland. Go for a stroll around the Grassmarket and the Old Town. If you don’t have a time restriction, just leave the map at home and walk. The best way to explore is also to get lost in a city.

     

    2)      Walk up Arthur's seat. Did you know that Arthur's seat actually is an old volcano? You can choose different routes depending on what you fancy. This is one of the routes you could take: https://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/lothian/arthurs-seat.shtml 

     

    3)      Cramond and Cramond island.  The views are amazing but watch out for the tide, you can get stuck! You can find the times here: https://tides.willyweather.co.uk/dg/edinburgh/firth-of-forth----cramond-island.html

     

     

    4) Explore the museums. Bored on a proper rainy day? It’s ok though because Edinburgh has plenty of museums and most of them are free. The National Museum of Scotland lets you discover everything from history on Scotland to the modern Scots life. You even get to listen to the various Scottish accents. (I still don’t understand the Scottish accent either) https://www.nms.ac.uk/national-museum-of-scotland/

     

    5) Go to Rose street. Probably one of my favourite streets in the city. It's a long cobbled street with lots of nice pubs and nice old buildings. A lot of pubs in Edinburgh offer free gigs, take a look here for more info: http://www.gigguide.co.uk/Edinburgh%20Listings/edinburghmonday.htm

     

    6) Pentlands Hills Regional Park. A bit of a bus journey out of town. In the Pentlands, you can hike, run or cycle pretty much any distance you want. Very quickly, you will feel far from the city. You can find more information about the Pentlands here: http://www.pentlandhills.org/info/15/routes_and_trails

     

     

     

    7) Go to Stockbridge. Lovely buildings, lots of charity shops, and some nice parks. http://www.stockbridgemarket.com/stockbridge.html You can also very easily spend an entire afternoon visiting art exhibitions for free. You might be lucky enough to meet some local Scottish artists.

     

    8) Water of Leith and Dean village. A 12 mile path that you can access from various places across the city: http://static1.1.sqspcdn.com/static/f/316376/2582239/1235676949007/W+of+L+walkway+map.pdf?token=k5G7MyOWijbiXDWnmBVCNQtyxtM%3D  Part of the Walkway goes through Dean Village, a wee village in the middle of nowhere.

     

     

    9) Portobello beach and the promenade. Hop in a bus and get off at Portobello High Street. Use this opportunity to unwind, relax and maybe even go for a dip in the lovely cool waters of the Firth of Forth.

     

     

    10) Hope on a bus and explore South Queensferry. Another one of my favourite areas. A high street just by the sea and a wee harbour. You will discover the famous Forth Road Bridge and once again, experience some fabulous views.

     

     

     

    So here we are, 10 wonderful things to do and all free.

     

  • Fri 23 Aug 2019 14:33

     

    It can be scary moving into a new city for the first time and having to find your way when everything is new for you. Relax, take your time – Edinburgh is a relatively compact city, so it won’t be long before you know your way around! You can get almost anywhere on foot, but if your accommodation is a bit away from your campus or you want to go exploring, there are a lot of options.

     

     

    Walking

    Walking is a great way to get to know a new city, because it allows you to move at a pace slow enough to really get a feel for a new place and discover new shortcuts that you might not find on a map. It really helps to develop a mental picture of the city, which will help you find your way in the future. Don’t be afraid to get lost from time to time – we’ve all done it, and you might discover new parts of the city this way. It’s also a great way to de-stress, so you might want to choose to walk to campus on a sunny day, or go for a brisk walk through one of Edinburgh’s many parks.

     

     

    Cycling

    Cycling is fun and provides a bit of exercise too. Of course, like any major city, bikes are a particularly popular target for thieves. To avoid losing your trusted bike in this way, invest in a sturdy lock. You can buy a reduced-price (£10) gold standard bike d-lock from the university Transport and Parking Office. You should also get it marked, so that if it does get stolen, the police have a better chance of locating it. You can find more info here.

     

    The University also has several secure bike storage points across the campuses.

     

    If you don’t need a bike regularly, but just want to go for a nice ride sometime, keep your eye out for the various points around Edinburgh where you can get rental bikes for an hour or an entire day.

     

     

    Tram/Bus

    If you need to cover a longer distance or need to travel late at night, the tram or a bus are a good and reliable way to get around.

     

    For those studying at King’s Buildings, there is a free shuttle bus from Central campus to KB during the week (not available during vacation periods). Vet students can get subsidized bus passes to get to Easter Bush campus – get in touch with your school for information on how to access these.

     

    To get around Edinburgh, Lothian Buses is the main bus operator. A single adult ticket is £1.70 and you can get a return for £4.00. If you are returning from a party or other fun activity late at night, you can also get on the night bus, running between 12 and 4:30am, for £3.00. You can buy tickets on the bus paying cash or using your card, or you can buy them ahead and activate them just before you board.

     

    You can also get a Student Ridacard (for one week, four weeks, nine months or a year). A Ridacard will work out cheaper than just buying singles if you use the bus or tram at least twice a day. You can also buy advance single tickets or day tickets at any Lothian bus travelshop. The 9-month Student Ridacard is only available for purchase between 1st September and 30th October.

     

    The tram routes are more limited than bus routes, running from Edinburgh Airport to York Place in the city centre. You can find a route map here. Single tickets are £1.70 and a return is £3.20. You can also get a day ticket for £4.00.

     

     

    Taxi

     

    Edinburgh is a very safe city but sometimes it makes sense to be careful and get a taxi home. You could pre-arrange a time to leave a night out with friends, so that you won’t be getting a taxi alone. You can flag down a taxi on the street, or you can pre-book one through certain mobile apps.

     

    You can check how much a journey might cost you here: taxifarefinder.com.  If you need a taxi but don’t have enough money, you can use the Student Association Taxi Scheme, where we will pay for your taxi and you can pay is back. 

     

     

     

    Train

     

    Keen to explore other places in Scotland (or even England)?  It’s very easy to hop on a train to explore. Edinburgh has two major railway stations: Edinburgh Waverley (the main one on Princes Street) and Haymarket. You can buy tickets in the train stations or online from the the main train provider’s websites:

    scotrail.co.uk

     

    virgintrainseastcoast.com

     

    crosscountrytrains.co.uk

     

    • Or other ticketing websites such as

     

    thetrainline.com

     

    If you’re an EU or international student and are not used to the British train system, don’t make the same mistake I once did by accidentally buying a ticket for the wrong operator. Trains are privatized in the UK, meaning there are several providers operating and not all tickets will work on all trains. To avoid unpleasant surprises, always double check whether your ticket is correct for the train you wish to take.

     

    To save some money, it’s best to book tickets as much in advance as possible. Tickets usually become available to purchase three months before the travel date.

     

    Railcards are also available for groups such as 16-25 year olds, full-time students of any age, over 60s and people with disabilities. These cards offer 1/3 off most rail fares.

     

    Note that 16-25 rail cards last for a year, so it’s a good idea to renew one in the week before your 26th birthday. You can find more information here.

     

    There are also apps that can help work out the cheapest fare.  Sometimes splitting your journey into two can work out cheaper than a ticket for a whole journey.  Read more about this here.

     

     

     

  • Mon 19 Aug 2019 14:52

     

    Some students use private proofreading services for assistance with their essays.  Although this isn’t against University regulations there are some important things to bear in order to avoid committing academic misconduct, and to ensure the service you are using is genuine.

     

    Dos and don’ts

    The University regulations allow for students to hire professional proofreaders. However, to avoid the risk of committing an academic misconduct offense, bear in mind that there are restrictions on what a professional proofreader can do with your University work. 

     

    A proofreader can only comment on spelling, grammar and the general clarity of written English.

     

    A proofreader must not offer suggestions on style, content, argumentation, structure, flow and conclusions.  If they do and you use these suggestions, this is a form of academic misconduct and it’s treated very seriously by the University.

     

    Finding a proofreading service

    As an impartial service we are unable to recommend specific proofreaders.  If you choose to use a proofreader then we would advise agreeing a price in advance of sending work to them. 

    Be aware that some websites that will store the work of students to sell on without asking permission first – so make sure your proofreader is genuine.  If you are unsure about a particular service then do contact us for advice.

     

    Other resources

    Check out the University’s Institute for Academic Development for study and learning resources, advice and support with your studies as well as workshops to help you succeed with your studies.


Page last updated:
07/06/2019