Undergraduate Funding

Making sure that you have a viable plan in place to cover both your tuition fees and living costs for the duration of your time at university, will allow you to make the most of your time at Edinburgh. This needs to be planned out well in advance of starting your degree, come and see us for support and advice if you have any concerns. 

 

 

If you are a UK or EU citizen and, you were ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK, Channel Islands or Isle of Man for the three years immediately prior to the start of your degree course, and you were ‘ordinarily resident’ in Scotland on the first day of the month of August of the year that you started your degree, you may be entitled to financial support from the Scottish Government.

 

If you do not meet this general residence condition, it is always worth checking whether you will meet any of the Scottish Government's alternative residence criteria. You can do so by reading this guidance or by contacting a member of our team for further advice.

 

Undergraduate student funding offered by the Scottish Government is, for the most part, managed by an organisation called SAAS (Student Awards Agency Scotland).

 

I’m not sure if I would be considered to have been ‘ordinarily’ resident in Scotland

To be counted as ‘ordinarily’ resident in a specific country, you will need to be able to show that, that country was your main place of residence.

 

SAAS will not usually treat you as being ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK or Scotland if that residence was, wholly, or mainly, for the purpose, of receiving full-time education.

 

If you were living outside of the UK/Scotland in the three years prior to the start of your course, but this period of absence was ‘temporary’ you may be able to argue that you were still ordinarily resident in the UK/Scotland. Contact our service for more information.

 

Several other, less common, exceptions apply. More detailed information on SAAS’ residence rules, can be found here. But, if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to speak with an adviser.

 

So, what financial support does SAAS offer?

Funding packages provided by SAAS include support towards your tuition fees and support towards your living costs in the form of a loan and/or various bursaries and grants.

 

Tuition Fee Support

The university will typically charge you a tuition fee of £1,820 each academic year. If you meet the relevant eligibility criteria these fees will be covered by the Scottish Government. But you will need to apply for tuition fee support from SAAS, for this to happen.

 

The Living Costs Loan

The main source of living costs funding for most undergraduates from Scotland is in the form of a student loan. This is partially income-assessed and so the amount received can vary, but ranges from £4,750 - £6,750. You do not have to take out a student loan if you do not need it and can opt to take out only a proportion of the amount offered. It is repayable and does accrue interest but the repayment terms are, in general, much more favourable that other forms of borrowing such as bank loans and credit cards.  Further information on how the student loan works can be found here.

 

Students aged under 26 when they started their degree programme who meet the relevant eligibility criteria and who have ever had experience in care, may be able to access SAAS’ Care Experienced Student Bursary rather than the living costs loan. This bursary is not repayable. Further information can be found below.

 

The Young Students' Bursary and Independent Students’ Bursary

Students with a household income of less than £34,000 may, unless in receipt of the Care Experienced Student Bursary, also be eligible for either a Young Student Bursary or an Independent Students’ Bursary from SAAS. Which bursary you receive will depend on a range of factors including your age, your living situation and whether you have any children. Full information can be found on pages 15 and 16 of this guide. But the amount provided ranges from £1,000- £2,000/ year. This is not repayable.

 

Students in receipt of the Young Student Bursary or Independent Student Bursary may also be entitled to access this scholarship from the university. The Scotland Scholarship aims to support Scotland domiciled students with their living costs whilst at university. Amounts awarded range from £500-£3000/ academic year. As long as you have applied for your full SAAS entitlement and have also provided SAAS with consent to share your information for bursary purposes, you should be assessed for this scholarship automatically. But if you have any queries or concerns, do feel free to get in touch with the scholarships team or ourselves for further advice.

 

Previous study rules are in place which can sometimes limit a student’s ability to access both the Young Students' Bursary and The Independent Students' Bursary. And this in turn can limit access to The Scotland Scholarship. Scroll down for some further information on these rules.

 

The Care Experienced Students Bursary

Students who were aged under 26 when they started their studies and who have ever had experience in care may be eligible for the Care Experience Bursary from SAAS. Experience in care can include time spent living with family or close friends (in a kinship care arrangement overseen by the council), time spent in foster care, being adopted, time spent in a residential care home and any time in which you were “looked after” by your local council.

 

Students eligible for this bursary receive £8,100 per academic year. This can make a real difference to your income and so we encourage all students who think they may be eligible, to consider applying. If you are not sure whether you would count as being care-experienced but either spent time not living with your birth family OR were aware of any social work involvement in your care, contact our welfare team. Our welfare advisers will be able to help you to determine whether you would be classified as care-experienced and will also be able to support you in gathering any documentation needed to evidence this in your application for funding.

 

If you are in receipt of the Care Experienced Students' Bursary, you will also be able to access an award of £3000 from the university’s Scotland Scholarship Scheme. As long as you have provided SAAS with consent to share your information for bursary purposes, you should be assessed for this scholarship automatically. But if you have any queries or concerns, do feel free to get in touch with the scholarships team or ourselves for further advice.

 

As a care-experienced student, you may also be able to access the Care Experienced Accommodation Grant from SAAS. This is a grant of up to £105/week over the summer holiday. Further information on this grant can be found here. And you could also consider applying for this scholarship, designed to assist students with their housing costs during the first three years of their studies.

 

Further information on the range of support that the university offers specifically to care-experienced students can be found here.

 

Living Costs Grants

SAAS offer a variety of other living costs grants to help with a range of needs includes additional assistance for students who care for an adult dependent, enhanced support for lone parents, and additional assistance with the extra costs that disabled students may incur whilst studying as a direct result of their disability. Further information can be found on pages 22-24 of this guide.

 

Additional Periods of Study (SAAS’ Previous Study Rules)

There isn’t any fixed limit to how many years students can access the living costs loan or living cost grants from SAAS. You will, however, need to be enrolled on a full-time degree programme (even if you are temporarily attending part-time) and to have had your attendance confirmed for the academic year you will be claiming the loan for. If you need to take time out from your studies, your ability to continue to access the living costs loan for the remainder of the academic year will depend upon your circumstances. See section below.

 

SAAS do place a limit on how many years undergraduate students are able to access tuition fee and bursary support from the Scottish Government. If you have already successfully completed a degree level qualification, SAAS will not usually offer tuition fee or bursary support for time spent undertaking a second undergraduate degree. Although, exceptions apply. Full details can be found here.

 

For students who have not yet attained a degree level qualification, the general rule is that SAAS will provide tuition fee (and, where applicable, bursary) support for the minimum number of years that a student would usually need to complete their current programme of study

PLUS

1 (gift) year where needed*

 

* Students in receipt of the Care-Experienced Student Bursary are provided with two gift years rather than one.

 

If you have undertaken any advanced study prior to your current course (i.e. if you started an HNC/HND or degree level course and subsequently withdrew or if you transferred course), this will generally be taken into account when SAAS assess how many years you have used up. Likewise, any additional period of study resulting from an academic repeat or an interruption from study will generally be taken into account, as a year that has been used up. However if you are able to show that no tuition fee charge was incurred for a specific academic year (e.g. you withdrew or interrupted very shortly after your attendance was confirmed), that particular year will not be taken into account when SAAS assesses your eligibility for funding in subsequent years.

 

Where SAAS can see that there will be a shortfall between

 

 

 

the minimum number of years that a student would usually need to complete their current programme of study + 1

 

AND

 

 

The number of years that a student has received tuition fee support from SAAS or any other EU public funds PLUS the number of years that a student will require to complete their chosen degree programme

 

they will usually require a student to seek alternative means to cover their tuition fees until they have progressed onto the next year of their degree programme.

 

Students can ask SAAS to make an exception to these general limits to tuition fee support if the need for any extension in support is the result of exceptional circumstances (e.g. ill health). The Advice Place is able to support students in putting their case as persuasively as possible to SAAS and can also assist students affected by these previous study rules in searching for alternative funds.

 

We have provided a couple of illustrative examples below. But if you have any concerns about how a period of additional study will affect your funding options, feel free to contact our team.

 

Example 1

In 2012, Mark started a degree in Archaeology at Aberdeen University. Mark decided that the course was not for him and left Aberdeen University five months after starting his course. He subsequently decided to begin the MA(Hons) in Scottish Literature at Edinburgh. Mid-way through his second year, he contracted glandular fever and this affected his ability to complete essential exams and coursework in his second semester. As a consequence, he was informed by his college that he would not be able to progress into his third year as he needed to pass some essential modules. Mark therefore needed to take a repeat year in 2015/16. Mark’s household income is too high for receipt of the Young Student’s Bursary from SAAS or the Scotland Scholarship from the university.

 

Academic Year

Degree Programme

Year of Programme

SAAS Tuition Fee Support Provided?

2012/13

MA (Hons) Archaeology

1

Yes

2013/14

MA (Hons) Scottish Literature

1

Yes- this was counted as a +1 (gift) year.

2014/15

MA (Hons) Scottish Literature

2

Yes

2015/16

MA (Hons) Scottish Literature

2

No- Mark had already used up his +1 year.

2016/17

MA (Hons) Scottish Literature

3

Yes

2017/18

MA (Hons) Scottish Literature

4

Yes

 

Mark did received a living costs loan from SAAS in 2015/16 but was unable to access any tuition fee support from SAAS that year. After seeking advice, Mark considered presenting his circumstances to SAAS and asking them to reconsider their decision not to provide tuition fee support. But, decided to apply for a tuition fee grant from the Carnegie Trust instead. This option worked for Mark.

 

If Mark’s household income was lower and he would have otherwise been entitled to the Young Students' Bursary and the Scotland Scholarship, he would have been better off seeking an exception from SAAS in the first instance.

 

Example 2

Between 2012-2015, Chantelle spent three years studying the MA (Hons) in Sociology. After spending the Summer completing an internship with a charity, she decided she would like to pursue a career in social policy. She subsequently spoke through her options with her personal tutor and decided to transfer to the MA (Hons) in Social Policy in September 2015. Chantelle was granted direct entry into the third year of this programme. 

 

Academic Year

Degree Programme

Year of Programme

SAAS Tuition Fee Support Provided?

2012/13

MA (Hons) Sociology

1

Yes

2013/14

MA (Hons) Sociology

2

Yes

2014/15

MA (Hons) Sociology

3

Yes

2015/16

MA (Hons) Social Policy

3

Yes- this was counted as a +1 (gift) year.

2016/17

MA (Hons) Social Policy

4

Yes

 

 

Taking an Interruption of Study

As soon as your interruption has been fully processed by the university, you will need to notify SAAS of your change of circumstances. At this point, your living costs support from SAAS, will normally be suspended. If you have recently received any living costs support from SAAS, you may be asked to pay back part of this, most recent instalment. The amount you are asked to pay back is calculated on a pro-rata basis in relation to proportion of time in attendance.

 

In cases in which you have needed to take an interruption due to ill-health or due to the need to care for someone, SAAS will make an exception and provide continuation of living costs support for the remainder of the year in which you suspended your studies. It is, however, really important that you explicitly state the reason for your interruption when notifying SAAS of your decision to suspend and that you also check with your personal tutor/ student support officer that your university records will reflect the fact that you have interrupted due to ill-health or interrupted due to caring responsibilities.

 

Students whose interruption continues beyond the start of the next academic year, should be aware that they will not be able to access living cost loans or bursaries from SAAS until they have resumed their studies and their attendance at university has been confirmed. If you get asked to repeat all credits for the subsequent academic year on an “exam-only” basis, you will not, unfortunately, be eligible for any living costs support for that academic year.

 

We know that any gap in funding support can create financial difficulties and would strongly encourage any student with concerns about this, to schedule a meeting with one of our welfare team who will help you to explore options for managing this. But in the meantime, we would encourage students with caring responsibilities, students with children and students experiencing ill health to take a look at our web content on benefits and tax credits.

 

Students Undertaking A Part-Time Repeat Year

Sometimes students are asked to undertake a 'part-time repeat' or 'make-up' year in order to either progress into the next year of their degree programme or in order to obtain the relevant credits to switch degree programme. 

 

Students in this position, should first of all check if any of these courses will require class attendance or if these credits will be repeated on an exam-only basis.

 

If all of the courses you are registered on for a particular academic year are to be taken on an exam-only basis, you will not, unfortunately, be able to access any living costs support from SAAS for that academic year. You will, however, not be charged any tuition fees by the university but may instead get charged a small resit fee. We know that any gap in funding support can create financial difficulties and would strongly encourage any student with concerns about this, to schedule a meeting with a member of our welfare team who will help you to explore options for managing this.

 

If any of the courses you need to undertake for your 'make-up'/ 'part-time repeat' year mean that you will be registered as required to attend classes for that particular year, you may still be able to access tuition fee support, living costs loans and (where applicable) bursary support from SAAS. It will be important to first of all check if you have already used up your +1 (gift) year. For more information on what the gift year is and whether you are likely to have used it up, please scroll up and read the 'Additional Periods of Study' section of this webpage. If you have not already used up your gift year AND will be required to attend classes in semester one, you will be able to access both living costs support and tuition fee support from SAAS on exactly the same basis as previous years. If you have not already used up your gift year AND will be required to attend classes in semester two only, the total amount of financial support you receive from SAAS will be assessed on exactly the same basis as in previous years. However, you would only be able to access that funding when your attendance has been confirmed again in January. You would need to apply for SAAS funding as a student enrolled on a full-time programme of study and would need to specify whether you were registered with required class attendance from September onwards or from January onwards.

 

Alternatively, students who need to undertake a 'make-up'/ 'part-time repeat' year and who will be required to attend classes, can choose to apply for a part-time tuition fee grant ,for that particular year, from SAAS instead. Students who take this option will not be able to access any living costs support from SAAS for that particular year but will be able to retain their gift year should it be needed in the future. We recommend that any students considering taking this option speak with an adviser before they take any action.

 

If you think you may have already used up your +1 (gift) year and will need to attend classes in order to undertake a 'part-time repeat'/make-up' year, please contact our welfare team for more tailored advice. Likewise, if you would like more tailored guidance on how the information above applies in your specific circumstances, please fee free go contact our welfare team for further advice. If you receive any bursaries or scholarships from the university or from charitable trusts, do also feel free to make contact with our service to check on how your change of circumstance will affect your continued ability to access this scholarship/bursary. 

 

How do I apply for SAAS funding?

You can apply for SAAS funding online. SAAS’ website provides full details on how to do so, including information on what documentation you will need to submit. If you encounter any difficulties, it will be worth contacting SAAS directly  in the first instance. And then, if you still have concerns, get in touch with us.

 

Students are expected to apply for each year of their course. This is the case, even if you are only applying for tuition fee support.

 

SAAS are open for applications for academic year 2019/20 from April 2019 onwards. If you would like to guarantee that both your tuition fee support and living costs support is in place for the start of the academic year you will need to have applied by 30/06/19. Whilst we recommend that students apply prior to 30/06/19, SAAS will still accept applications (for academic year 2019/20) up until 31/03/20 and you funding will be backdated.

 

 

I am worried that the financial support available to me will not be sufficient.

We know that many students experience these concerns. And would recommend that students in this situation take a look at our pages on budgeting, employment and extra funding. We would also encourage you to make contact with a member of our welfare team, who will be able to take a look at your situation in full and help you to explore ways of both  increasing the amount of funds that you have coming in and find ways of making best use of the resources that you have.

 

If you meet the eligibility criteria listed on this webpage, you may be able to access tuition fee and living costs support from Student Finance England (SFE). Student Finance England is responsible for administering an array of student funding options offered by the English Government. 

 

I’m not sure if I meet the residence criteria or not

We know that some of the residence rules can be quite tricky to navigate. Our staff will be able to look at your individual circumstances and help you to determine if you are likely to fulfil the relevant criteria for accessing financial support from SFE.

 

If you have already been assessed for financial support from SFE and you disagree with the decision made, we can also advise you on any relevant grounds for appeal.

 

So, what financial support does SFE offer?

 

Tuition Fee Loans

Student Finance England offers tuition fee loans of up to £9,250 to eligible students undertaking an undergraduate course at University of Edinburgh. Any tuition fee loan awarded will be paid directly to the university. These loans do come with repayment terms and accrue interest over time but, in most cases, would be considered a ‘good debt’. You can find further information here.

 

Maintenance Loans

The main source of living costs funding for most undergraduates from England is in the form of a student loan. The amount that you will be able to access depends on a range of factors including where you are living, your household income and the year that you started your degree programme. If you started your course after August 2018, you can get an estimate of how much you will be entitled to by using this calculator. Otherwise, the information contained in this guide will help you to gauge how much you will be entitled to.

 

Maintenance Grants

If you started your degree before August 2016, you may also be entitled to an income-assessed maintenance grant. Further information can be found here.

 

Supplementary Grants

SFE also offer a range of living costs grants to assist students with children and students with a disability. SFE also offer additional support with travel costs for students who are studying abroad and for medical and dental students undertaking clinical placements.

 

Students with a household income of below £42,600 (if they started their degree before academic year 2019/20 or £35,000 (if they started their degree after academic year 2019/20) may also be eligible for further support from a University of Edinburgh Scholarship. Full information provided here. These scholarships have a value of up to £8,500 / academic year. And so if you think you may be eligible but have not received notification of an award by November 1st, please contact us for advice.

 

Additional Periods of Study (SFE’s Previous Study Rules)

There isn’t any fixed limit to how many years students can access the living costs loan or living cost grants from SFE. You will, however, need to be enrolled on a full-time degree programme (even if you are temporarily attending part-time) and demonstrate that the university requires you to attend classes to access this support. If you need to take time out from your studies, your ability to continue to access the living costs loan for the remainder of the academic year will depend upon your circumstances. See section below.

 

SFE do place a limit on how many years undergraduate students are able to access tuition fee support from the English Government. If you have already successful completed an honours level degree qualification, SFE will not usually offer a tuition fee loan for time spent undertaking a second undergraduate degree. Although, exceptions do apply. Pages 63-64 of this guidance chapter provides some further information. But, if you are not sure how these rules will apply to your specific circumstances, please feel free to get in touch with a member of our welfare team.

 

For students who have not yet attained a honours level degree qualification, the general rule is that SFE will provide the tuition fee loan for the minimum number of years that a student would usually need to complete their current programme of study

PLUS

1 (gift) year where needed

 

If you have undertaken any advanced study prior to your current course (i.e. if you started an HNC/HND or degree level course and subsequently withdrew or if you transferred course), this will generally be taken into account when SFE assess how many years you have used up. Likewise, any additional period of study resulting from an academic repeat or an interruption from study will generally be taken into account, as a year that has been used up as long as your attendance at university was confirmed on your student record.

 

Where SFE can see that there will be a shortfall between

 

 

 

the minimum number of years that a student would usually need to complete their current programme of study + 1

 

AND

 

 

The number of years that a student has received tuition fee support from SFE or any other EU public funds PLUS the number of years that, that student will require to complete their chosen degree programme

 

they will usually require a student to seek alternative means to cover their tuition fees until they have progressed onto the next year of their degree programme.

 

Students can however ask SFE to make an exception to these general limits to tuition fee support if the need for any extension in support is the result of exceptional circumstances (e.g. ill health). The Advice Place is able to support students in putting their case as persuasively as possible to SFE and can also assist students affected by these previous study rules in searching for alternative funds.

 

We have provided a couple of illustrative examples below. But if you have any concerns about how a period of additional study will affect your funding options, feel free to contact our team.

 

Example 1

In 2012, Mark started a degree in Archaeology at Warwick University. Mark decided that the course was not for him and left Warwick University five months after starting his course. He subsequently decided to begin the MA(Hons) in Scottish Literature at Edinburgh. Mid-way through his second year, he contracted glandular fever and this affected his ability to complete essential exams and coursework in his second semester. As a consequence, he was informed by his college that he would not be able to progress into his third year as he needed to pass some essential modules from his second year. Mark therefore needed to take a repeat year in 2015/16. Mark’s household income falls below £25,000.

 

Academic Year

Degree Programme

Year of Programme

SFE Tuition Fee Loan Provided?

2012/13

MA (Hons) Archaeology

1

Yes

2013/14

MA (Hons) Scottish Literature

1

Yes- this was counted as a +1 (gift) year.

2014/15

MA (Hons) Scottish Literature

2

Yes

2015/16

MA (Hons) Scottish Literature

2

Yes (but only, after presenting details of his exceptional circumstances).

2016/17

MA (Hons) Scottish Literature

3

Yes

2017/18

MA (Hons) Scottish Literature

4

Yes

 

In academic year 2015/16, Mark only needed to repeat a total of 60 credits. This meant that he was only liable for a tuition fee charge of £4,620. This, in turn meant, that despite having a household income of less than £42,600 and needing to attend classes across both semesters he would not automatically be able to access the University of Edinburgh Scholarship either.

 

With support from the Advice Place, Mark provided SFE with details of his circumstances and asked that they provide an exception to their general rules surrounding previous study. Mark was provided with an additional year’s tuition fee loan from SFE. 

 

Example 2

Between 2012-2015, Chantelle spent three years studying the MA (Hons) in Sociology. After spending the Summer completing an internship with a charity, she decided she would like to pursue a career in social policy. She subsequently spoke through her options with her personal tutor and decided to transfer to the MA (Hons) in Social Policy in September 2015. Chantelle was granted direct entry into the third year of this programme.  

 

Academic Year

Degree Programme

Year of Programme

SFE Tuition Fee Loan Provided?

2012/13

MA (Hons) Sociology

1

Yes

2013/14

MA (Hons) Sociology

2

Yes

2014/15

MA (Hons) Sociology

3

Yes

2015/16

MA (Hons) Social Policy

3

Yes- this was counted as a +1 (gift) year.

2016/17

MA (Hons) Social Policy

4

Yes

 

Taking an Interruption of Study

As soon as your interruption has been fully processed by the university, you will need to notify SFE of your change of circumstances. At this point, your living costs support from SFE, will normally be suspended. If you have recently received any living costs support from SFE, you may be asked to pay back part of this, most recent instalment. The amount you are asked to pay back is calculated on a pro-rata basis in relation to proportion of time in attendance. We know that this can place students in financial difficulty and our welfare advisers are on hand to help you to identify ways of minimising this.

 

SFE does offer students who need to take an interruption for health reasons with up to 60 days continuation of living costs support. It is important that students in this situation explicitly state that they are suspending for ‘health reasons’ when notifying their funding body of their interruption. It is also important that students in this situation ask their personal tutor/student support officer to ensure that their university record reflects the fact that they have interrupted for health reasons.

 

SFE has the discretion to offer extensions to living costs support in situations other than ill-health and for periods longer than 60 days. However, such discretion is only applied in cases in which a student can demonstrate that failure to provide an extension in living costs support would place them in significant financial hardship and would leave them in a position where they have no choice but to permanently abandon their programme of study. You will usually be expected to have checked your entitlement to welfare benefits and other forms of financial support, and to have also looked at ways of minimising your expenditure before submitting a special request for continuation in living costs support. A member of our welfare team can support you in exploring your eligibility for other forms of financial support and in putting together a case for continuation of support to your funding body.

 

Students whose interruption continues beyond the start of the next academic year, should be aware that they will not be able to access living cost loans or bursaries from SFE until they have resumed their studies and their attendance at university has been confirmed. If you are only needing to attend classes for one semester only, your living costs support from SFE will be reduced. The amount that you will receive will be calculated on a pro-rata basis in accordance with the number of days that you are registered as required to attend university. Students in receipt of the University of Edinburgh Scholarship should be aware that periods of interruption can sometimes affect entitlement. Contact the Advice Place for further guidance.

 

Students asked to repeat all credits for the subsequent academic year on an “exam-only” basis will not, unfortunately, be eligible for any living costs support for that academic year.

 

We know that any gap in funding support can create financial difficulties and would strongly encourage any student with concerns about this, to schedule a meeting with one of our welfare team who will help you to explore options for managing this. But in the meantime, we would encourage students with caring responsibilities, students with children and students experiencing ill health to take a look at our pages on benefits and tax credits.

 

Students Undertaking A Part-Time Repeat Year

Sometimes students are asked to undertake a 'part-time repeat' or 'make-up' year in order to either progress into the next year of their degree programme or in order to obtain the relevant credits to switch degree programme. 

 

Students in this position, should first of all check if any of these courses will require class attendance or if these credits will be repeated on an exam-only basis.

 

If all of the courses you are registered on for a particular academic year are to be taken on an exam-only basis, you will not, unfortunately, be able to access any living costs support from SFE for that academic year. You will, however, not be charged any tuition fees by the university but may instead get charged a small resit fee. We know that any gap in funding support can create financial difficulties and would strongly encourage any student with concerns about this, to schedule a meeting with a member of our welfare team who will help you to explore options for managing this.

 

If any of the courses you need to undertake for your 'make-up'/ 'part-time repeat' year mean that you will be registered as required to attend classes for that particular year, you may still be able to access tuition fee support, maintenance loans and (where applicable) living costs grants from SFE. It will be important to first of all check if you have already used up your +1 (gift) year. For more information on what the gift year is and whether you are likely to have used it up, please scroll up and read the 'Additional Periods of Study' section of this webpage. If you have not already used up your gift year AND will be required to attend classes in both semesters,  you will be able to access both living costs support and tuition fee support from SFE on the same basis as previous years.  If you have not already used up your gift year AND will be required to attend classes for one semester only, you will be able to access a tuition fee loan from SFE but you will only be able to access the maintenence loan/grant when in attendance. And so, the amount that you will receive in maintenance loan/grant is likely to be significantly less than that received in previous years. Students in receipt of the University of Edinburgh Scholarship should be aware that periods of interruption can sometimes affect entitlement. Contact the Advice Place for further guidance.

 

 

How Do I Apply for SFE Funding?

You can apply for SFE funding online. SFE’s website provides full details on how to do so, including information on what documentation you will need to submit. If you encounter any difficulties, contact SFE directly in the first instance. And then, if you still have concerns, get in touch with us.

 

Continuing students should remember that they need to apply for funding each year.

 

SFE are open for applications for academic year 2019/20 from April 2019 onwards. If you would like to guarantee that both your tuition fee support and living costs support is in place for the start of the academic year you will need to apply by 24/05/19 (if a new student) or 21/06/19 (if a continuing student). Whilst we recommend that students apply as soon as possible, SFE will still accept applications (for academic year 2019/20) up until 31/05/20 and your funding will be back dated.

 

I am worried that the financial support available to me will not be sufficient.

We know that many students experience these concerns. And would recommend that students in this situation take a look at our pages on budgeting, employment and extra funding. We would also encourage you to make contact with a member of our welfare team, who will be able to take a look at your situation in full and help you to explore ways of both  increasing the amount of funds that you have coming in and find ways of making best use of the resources that you have.

 

Undergraduate student funding offered by the Scottish Government is, for the most part, managed by an organisation called SFW (Student Finance Wales).

 

Funding packages provided by Student Finance Wales include tuition fee loans (of up to £9,250), living costs loans and grants (with a combined value of up to £9,225 for students living away from home and studying outside or London) and various supplementary grants to assist disabled students and student parents.

 

Further information on funding available, as well as details of the relevant eligibility criteria and application processes can be found at this website.

 

Students with a household income of below £42,600 (if they started their degree before academic year 2019/20) or £35,000 (if they started their degree after academic year 2019/20)  may also be eligible for further support from a University of Edinburgh Scholarship. Full information provided here.

 

If you have any difficulty in determining how this information applies to you or if you have any other questions about financing your studies, please feel free to get in touch with our welfare team.

 

Undergraduate student funding offered by the Northern Irish Government is, for the most part, managed by an organisation called SFNI (Student Finance Northern Ireland).

 

Funding packages provided by Student Finance Northern Ireland include tuition fee loans (of up to £9,250), living costs loans and grants (with a combined value of up to £8,315 for students living away from home and studying outside or London) and various supplementary grants.

 

Further information on funding available, as well as details of the relevant eligibility criteria and application processes can be found at this website.

 

Students with a household income of £42,600 (if they started their degree before academic year 2019/20) or £35,000 (if they started their degree after academic year 2019/20)  may also be eligible for further support from a University of Edinburgh Scholarship. Full information provided here.

 

If you have any difficulty in determining how this information applies to you or if you have any other questions about financing your studies, please feel free to get in touch with our welfare team.

 

If you are a UK/EU citizen and were living in a (non-UK) EU country prior to starting your studies at Edinburgh, and moved to Scotland to start your degree course, you may be able to access tuition fee support from the Scottish Government.  Further information on the relevant eligibility criteria and details on how to apply can be found at the Student Award Agency Scotland website.

 

Whilst securing tuition fee support is helpful, it is vitally important that students also consider how they will manage their living costs over the full period of their degree course. This link provides some information on living costs in Edinburgh and this link provides some useful guidance on combining paid work with your studies.

 

Scholarship and bursary opportunities for undergraduate students from the EU can be quite limited. But do take a look at the University’s website and our extra funding page for further information on places to search for funding and for details on some of the options available. You can also check if your home government offers and funding support to students in your situation.

 

UK/EU citizens who have been living in Scotland, Wales, England or Northern Ireland for some time prior to starting their studies in Edinburgh may be entitled to living costs support from the UK government. Check out the sections above for further information on the relevant eligibility criteria.

 

If you need a visa to study in Edinburgh or were living outside of the EU for the three years’ immediately prior to the start of your degree course, you will not, unfortunately, be eligible for any statutory student funding from the UK government.

 

However, you may be able to access financial support from your home government or from other sources such as merit-based scholarships from the university. Do also take a look at our page on extra funding for details on other places to search for financial support.

 

 

Special arrangements apply for students who are refugees or asylum seekers. Please contact our service for more information.  


Page last updated:
31/05/19