Manifesto

Candidate for the position of Law Undergraduate School Representative

Image for Rakan Abu Tayeh

Rakan Abu Tayeh

Hi, My name is Rakan Abu Tayeh, I am a first year law student from Jordan, and I am running for the role of Law Undergraduate School Representative.

 

My goals for this position include:

 

1- Involving students who are fully learning remotely with on-campus culture, especially students studying from overseas.

I spent the better half of my year binge-watching pre-recorded online lectures from my bedroom, and then when I finally was able to fly over to Edinburgh, the country quickly went into lockdown. Which a lot of the times felt lonely, confusing, and isolating. Adjusting to university is difficult as it is, but it makes it way more difficult when you have to do it thousands of kilometers away from where you're supposed to be. This is why it is a goal of mine when I hold this position to work on involving remote-learning students with on-campus culture. That could happen through online social events where students can engage and form friendships. This can also happen through developing an accessible system that is available to support the social, mental, and academic well-being of the students.

 

2- More In-person activities and socials for undergraduate law students.

Lately, Students have been deprived of any social interaction with their peers. Which made it hard for law students and especially first-years to meet others in their year and course. Many the students haven't been able to explore the city and have been confined to their accommodation. This is a way to help law students mingle with others in their course, and a way to make the university experience more enjoyable. The city of Edinburgh has a lot to offer, and many safe activities can be held around it. This does not neglect the current situation of the pandemic and will follow the Scottish government's health and safety guidelines.

 

3- Holding the school accountable for the students' wellbeing and academic performance.

The school of law has been doing a lot to support the students in these trying times, but I believe that the student voices have not been properly heard. Not once have we received any sufficiant communication from the university asking us how we need to be supported. Instead, they decided for us what they thought we needed. How could they listen to our concerns when we receive an automated reply every time we send an email saying "this could take up to 10 days to be answered"? Therefore we need to build an accessible and accurate method of communication between students and decision makers in the school of law, and the school of law needs to listen to student concerns and needs.